Case Studies – schools working together

Schools working together in Film Technology

UK Schools working together on projects

  • Goldstone Primary School, Brighton
  • Ralph Butterfield Primary School, York

Imaging Partnership connected Goldstone Primary School in Brighton with Ralph Butterfield Primary School in York so both schools could share learning experiences.

Both schools had separately approached Imaging Partnership to design and deliver a series of afterschool workshops that explored transferring visual arts skills into wider industries. Ralph Butterfield

Imaging Partnership suggested that the schools work together as they progressed through the workshop series which was delivered over 10 weeks to seventeen 7 and 8 year olds.

The ideas was that both schools shared learning experiences and feedback to each other via their teachers and the Imaging Partnership practitions.

This approach was considered a success by both schools who reported enhanced learning and a development of confidence by both teachers and pupils.

Stephen Robinson from Imaging Partnership said

“Optical technologies are key technologies for our future. Their application in industry and science will increasingly make inroads into our everyday lives.

“We want to show young people that if they have skills in visual arts and media applications, these are very helpful foundation stones to developing a career in a range of emerging industries.

“Our approach is to show them to potential opportunities and give them lots of practical projects over the 10 weeks to building their skillset and their confidence in their own abilities.”

  • Sudbury Primary School, London
  • Ordsall primary School, Retford, Nottinghamshire

Teachers at Sudbury Primary School in London and Ordsall Primary School in NoOrdsallttinghamshire worked collaboratively to educate their pupils about imaging related careers.

Imaging Partnership practitioners worked in both schools, delivering an afterschool club over 7 weeks. The group of nearly 20 ten and eleven year olds learned about the range of careers that can be pursued with a skillset and knowledge of imaging and optics. Teachers for these respective year groups across the two schools were put in touch with each other with the aim of sharing knowledge, ideas and experiences of the Careers in Imaging Programme.

The programme included a wide range of activities. These included careers talks, organising an imaging related Careers Day, specific imaging topic sessions, looking at Emerging Industries that use optics, a business workshop and creating business innovations using imaging and optics.

  • Hayton Primary School, Cumbria
  • Ealdham Primary School, London

Create to innovate

Innovation in Photography brought together Hayton Primary School in Cumbria and Ealdham Primary School in London.

Over a six week period, the 10 and 11 year olds at these schools participated in a series of afterschool workshops to explore the idea of using photography to innovate.

Teachers at both schools shared experiences as the students progressed through the programme which was designed and delivered by Imaging Partnership. Hayton

Over the six weeks, students got involved with practical hands-on learning, designed to give a better understanding of how a camera works and to demonstrate how pupils can easily improve their images by following some basic principles. The approach was be informal and fun which was endorsed by feedback and the teachers alike.

The 10 hour programme was created around six topics – portraits, fine art photography, and landscapes in the world around us, documentary photography, still life and lifestyle photography and photography in motion.

The programme culminated in a workshop on how to translate the photographic work produced over the previous weeks into innovative products. Each pupil was asked to produce a final piece of work which was presented to the whole group.

Imaging Partnership aims to encourage all positive behaviour and involvement within the workshops to achieve a higher standard of work, while also giving pupils one-on-one assistance where needed encouraging asking for help when it is required.

  • Girton Glebe Primary School, Cambridgeshire
  • Whiston Worrygoodse Primary School, South Yorkshire

Twinning to win North and South

Two enthusiastic groups of 20 nine year olds at schools in Cambridge and South Yorkshire benefited from twice the learning experience through digital media.

Pupils at Girton Glebe Primary School Cambridgeshire and Whiston Worrygoodse Primary School, South Yorkshire both ran a series of nine weekly sessions simultaneously in curriculum time.

The digital media sessions were designed and delivered by Imaging Partnership. The schools came to be doing the workshops together because of a suggestion from the Imaging Partnership team who spotted that both schools wanted to explore digital media and had similar demographics and challenges with their schools.

Working on the same topics in real time meant that teachers and pupils could share learning experiences as well as each other’s work.

The ‘twinning’ scheme was hailed a success by both schools and the potential opportunity for shared learning has now become part of the Imaging Partnership offer.

During the nine weGirton Glebe Primaryeks, students learned how to create and produce a digital media project both as individuals and in groups.

They learned how to assess and select the appropriate tools to produce a digital media project, produce digital media projects using the appropriate software applications, research and analyse the current issues and future developments in digital media, social media and e-solutions, manage digital media projects and work with others to create projects as a team.

Wider activities included looking at an overview of the complexity of the international digital media and creative industries and how to communicate effectively in a media professional environment.

  • Faith’s at Ash School, Canterbury, Kent
  • Abbey Girls Independent School, Reading, Berkshire

Cinematic Art was the focus for two groups of students at schools in Canterbury and Reading.

St Faith’s at Ash School in Canterbury and Abbey Girls Independent School both opted to run a series of workshops with a group of 14 – 17 year olds to explore Cinematic Art.

The workshops were designed and run by Imaging Partnership who suggested that the schools may benefit from connecting together to share ideas and learning experiences.

St.Faiths At AshThis proved to be a successful collaboration and both schools were pleased by this partnership approach which was brought about by teachers and Imaging Partnership practitioners emailing each other throughout the 8 week duration of the workshop programme.

Throughout the programme, students worked independently and in group on cinematic related topics.  These included hair and make-up, fashion design, sound design, film making, 3D design (using computers), fine art, cinematography, animation, and visual effects.

Both schools reported back that they found the programme successful and students enjoyed the practical challenges and the exploration of cinematic related topics.

  • Peters Primary School, Merseyside
  • Rodbourne Cheney Primary School, Wiltshire

Meeting the Learner Profile for the International Baccalaureate was the goal for Imaging Partnership when working with two schools in Merseyside and Wiltshire.

The eleven year old students working towards the International Baccalaureate in both schools were brought together by Imaging Partnership who had been invited to deliver a series of creative workshops.

The workshops ran over 11 weeks in curriculum time and were focused on how to channel skills in visual arts and creativity into potential career pathways.

All aspects of the programme were designed and tested to ensure they met the learning outcomes specified in the Learner Profile for the International Baccalaureate. Rodbourne

These aspire to ensure the learners are inquirers, knowledgeable, thinkers, communicators, principled, open-minded, caring, risk-takers, balanced, and reflective.

During the workshop programme, students looked at their visual arts and creative skills in the context of potential careers. Whilst they completed practical projects and learned new visual arts skills, the objectives was for all students to see how their talents could be channels towards a satisfying and purposeful career.

Joanne Gennard from Imaging Partnership said

“Optical technologies are key technologies for our future. Their application in industry and science will increasingly make inroads into our everyday lives.

“We want to show young people that if they have skills in visual arts and media applications, these are very helpful foundation stones to developing a career in a range of emerging industries.

“Our approach is to show them to potential opportunities and give them lots of practical projects over the 10 weeks to building their skillset and their confidence in their own abilities.”

  • Ivydale Primary School, Southwark, London
  • Chilton Primary School, County Durham

Despite the 300 mile distance, two schools in the north and south of England benefited from a shared learning experience in digital photography.

Ivydale Primary School Southwark in London and Chilton Primary School in County Durham both appointed Imaging Partnership to deliver a series of after school workshops to a group of 11 year olds.

Imaging Partnership suggested that the schools might like to form a learning partnership for the duration of the six week learning programme.  Ivydale

The idea was that pupils could share ideas and view each other’s work to get the most from the overall learning experience.

During the programme, students learned how to compose and take effective digital photographs, how to use lighting effects, portrait and landscape photography, and set up documentary and moving shots. By the end of the programme all students had created an individual portfolio and collaborated to create exciting and highly creative group projects.

  • Gosforth Academy, Newcastle Upon Tyne
  • Hinchley Wood Secondary School, Surrey

Looking at future careers was the focus for two groups of sixth formers in Newcastle upon Tyne and Surrey.

Leading visual communications provider, Imaging Partnership, designed and delivered the Employability programme at both schools who were running them concurrently.

Imaging Partnership’s Employability Programme is specifically designed for students who are thinking about pursuing a career in the visual arts sector, whether as employees or as business owners and entrepreneurs.

Gosforth AcademyTeachers and students shared their experiences from the workshops. The Imaging Partnership practitioners suggested that the schools could have an enhanced learning experience by sharing ideas together. This was done by email and over the phone throughout the programme.

The workshops were run over a ten week period in curriculum time, one afternoon per week.

Starting with a basic introduction to photography, this carefully structured programme enabled the students to progress to advanced photographic camera operating techniques and experimenting with a wide mix of lighting and composition styles.

Additionally, the students learn the latest ICT applications in photo-manipulation and digital artwork creation.

Students were supported to develop problem solving, organisation, team building, numeracy and negotiation skills, whilst acquiring the ability to use their own initiative, become self-motivated while working under pressure to deadlines.

The workshop series was very well received by the students who found it very practical, engaging, inspiring and fun to participate in.

 

  • Stockbridge Primary School, Hampshire
  • Broad town Primary School, Swindon, Wiltshire

Learning to use iPads and Tablets to enhance curriculum work and to create individual projects was explored in a series of six afternoon sessions at schools in Hampshire and Wiltshire.

Stockbridge Primary School in Hampshire and Broad Town Primary School in Swindon, Wiltshire were both learning about their iPads and Tablets at the same time, so linked together by Imaging Partnership, they shared ideas and learning experiences along the way. Broadtown Primary

There were nearly twenty ten year olds in both schools involved in the afternoon workshops.

Imaging Partnership designed and delivered the workshops to children and teachers using either their own personal or the school’s iPads or Tablets. The groups learned how to take photos as if looking through a digital camera and also take self-portraits either in portrait or landscape orientation

They also learned how to create photo journals or blogs, how to create an action packed comic book, how to use ‘light meters’ and ‘spirit levels’, how to create a time lapse video/photo blog , and how to bring words in different sizes, fonts and colours into pictures.

A session was dedicated to exploring free and low cost apps that enabled the children to edit and add audio tracks to their video footage shot on their iPad or tablet.

Everyone – including the teachers – enjoyed the sessions and fed back that they felt much more confident in using their devices and were relishing the opportunity to create professional and exciting looking projects as well as bringing digital learning more fully into the classroom.

  • Melbourn Primary School, Hertfordshire
  • Montpelier Primary School, Plymouth, Devon

Melbourn Primary School Hertfordshire and Montpellier Primary School Plymouth employed photography and visual arts skills to support and inspire students who were struggling with their core subjects.

Leading visual communications company, Imaging Partnership was engaged to design and deliver a series of after school sessions based on photography, cinematography and film making, and animation with the specific intention to support children’s learning in their core subjects of maths, English and ICT.

Steven Norris from Imaging Partnership said

“Our intervention workshops are really effective across all school age groups as visual media is assessable to a wide range of students and allows them to express themselves at a level that suits their individual abilities.”

“Students are encouraged to develop their own ideas to produce a final piece that they can be proud to show off. Imaging Partnership aims to encourage all positive behaviour and involvement within the workshops to achieve a higher standard of work while also giving pupils one-on-one assistance where needed and we encourage asking for help when it is required.”

The workshops delivered in Hertfordshire and Plymouth were similar in content so Imaging Partnership practitioners worked together with the teachers at the respective schools so they could share ideas and learning experiences.

The workshop series included seeing how photography can enhance curriculum subjects and students worked on their own current school projects to achieve this.

Melbourn PrimaryStudents learned the basics of how to operate a digital camera effectively, how to use light and understand its affect in an image, looked at different styles of photography from sports to landscapes and portraits.

Throughout the series students were encouraged to improve on their individual learning by learning how to motivate themselves.

In the cinematography workshop students learned how to apply the same principles of photography to moving image.  They gained an understanding how to work efficiently within a group, learning each person’s role.  Looking at examples from the film industry, allowing students to develop their own ideas resulted in an increase in motivation and application for all students.

All participants were involved in problem solving, project planning, shooting a short film, getting involved in its production and editing.

Students made their own animations using some simple but effective techniques and were able to see how animation can enhance their current projects in curriculum subjects.

 

  • Wolstanton High School, Staffordshire
  • Great Baddow High School, Essex

Nearly twenty sixteen year olds took part in a series of cinematography workshops delivered by Imaging Partnership in curriculum time.

Wolstanton High School in Staffordshire and Great Baddow High School in Essex were both running the workshop series in their respective schools, so they decided to get even more learning benefits by sharing ideas and experiences as they went along.

Great Baddow High SchoolThe morning workshops which ran over six weeks inspired the youngsters to get creative with their cameras and work collaboratively to create a finished film project.

This proved to be a successful collaboration and both schools were pleased by this partnership approach which was brought about by teachers and Imaging Partnership practitioners emailing each other throughout the duration of the workshop programme.

Throughout the programme, students worked independently and in group on cinematic related topics.  These included hair and make-up, fashion design, sound design, film making, 3D design (using computers), fine art, cinematography, production, animation, and visual effects.

Both schools reported back that they found the programme successful and students enjoyed the practical challenges and the exploration of cinematic related topics.

 

  • Punnetts Town Primary School, East Sussex
  • West Moor Primary School, Leeds

Visual Effects was the workshop theme for two groups of students in East Sussex and Leeds.

The workshops were held after school, one hour a week for six weeks, at Punnetts Town Primary School East Sussex and West Moor Primary School, Leeds.

As both schools had engaged Imaging Partnership to design and deliver the Visual Effects workshops, it was suggested that they would share ideas and learning experiences as the workshop series progressed.  This was particularly helpful as the pupils in both schools were aged nine and had a range of different learning outcomes. Punnetts Town Primary

The emphasis over the six weeks was on practical hands-on learning, designed to give a better understanding of how a camera works and to demonstrate how pupils can easily achieve exciting results by following some basic principles in visual effects. The approach was informal and fun.

Over the six weeks, pupils learned about physical digital camera effects, digital animation, lighting effects, digital effects, optical animation and in the final session, compositing and matte animation.

All students had the opportunity to complete their own digital projects and to collaborate in group projects.

 

  • Kanes Hill Primary School, Southampton
  • Ashmole Primary School, Oval, London

Seeing in 3D was the focus for two groups of students at schools in Southampton and London.

Over a six week afterschool workshop series pupils from Kanes Hill Primary School, Southampton and Ashmore Primary School, Oval London were exploring 3D design.

3D design is a subject which can support a wide range of interests and skills and the pupils, aged eight engaged in the topic from the first session.   Kanes Hill

Over the six week series of workshops, students investigated how we view things in 3D and created their own designs using their own artwork, digital photography and their PCs and laptops.  They learned how to refine their designs with the use of plans, diagrams and prototypes made with low cost materials.

Pupils learned how to use computer software such as Google sketch-up, and CoralDraw to enhance the designing process.  Looking at potential manufacturing processes which would be the most efficient and effective for the chosen project produced some lively and interesting discussions!

  • Bolton Independent School, Lancashire
  • Norwich High School for Girls, Norfolk 

Fine Art workshops set the scene for creative mornings at Bolton Independent School Lancashire and Norwich High School for Girls in Norfolk.

Over three weeks, two groups of seventeen year old students used fine art as the focus for their digital photography workshops.

Bolton Indep. SchoolDelivered by leading visual communications company, Imaging Partnership, the 90 minute workshops were highly practical and encouraged students to learn new skills, understand effective lighting, and build their confidence using a digital camera to produce fine art work.

Fine art explores and develops in many creative areas of art and design. Some examples of these areas include, drawing, painting, mixed media, sculpture, land art, installation and lens-based media.

One of the main factors of understanding fine art is the research and investigation process so students looked at a wide body of existing fine art work and took inspiration from culture and history to develop their own individual style.

Students created their own scrap-books and design boards, and received support in the visual and written presentation of their work.

  • Kirk Merrington Primary School, North Yorkshire
  • St.Pauls’ Primary School, Wokingham, Berkshire

Learning how to edit digital photography was the focus for two groups of students from schools in North Yorkshire and Berkshire.

Imaging Partnership had been asked to design and deliver a series of afterschool workshops on editing at Kirk Merrington Primary School, North Yorkshire and St Paul’s Primary school, Wokingham Berkshire.  Imaging Partnership practitioners delivering the programmes suggested that the schools learn from each other by sharing learning experiences.  Kirk Merrington

Over the six week workshop period, students learned how to import and capture digital film footage using their own digital cameras and PCs. They produced and followed storyboards, notes and edits, and produced a ‘rough cut’ from a basic video sequence.

Added effects, audio editing and sound levels prompted lots of engagement from the students who created their own sound effects and music too.

Students then fine-tuned their work to produce a final edit. The workshops were hailed a great success with some students stating they would like to pursue a career using these new skills as a starting point.

  • Evelyn Primary School, Liverpool
  • New Seaham Primary School, Newcastle Upon Tyne

Photography was the joint focus in for two groups of students based in Liverpool and Newcastle upon Tyne both working towards the International Baccalaureate.

Over a six week period, the students attended afterschool workshops exploring practical digital photography. Teachers of the groups of nine year olds shared learning experiences and ideas that had emerged during the workshop series.  New Seaham Primary

The nine year old students working towards the International Baccalaureate in both schools were brought together by Imaging Partnership who had been invited to deliver the series of creative workshops.

All aspects of the workshop programme were designed and tested to ensure they met the learning outcomes specified in the Learner Profile for the International Baccalaureate. These seek to ensure the learners are inquirers, knowledgeable, thinkers, communicators, principled, open-minded, caring, risk-takers, balanced, and reflective.

The Imaging Partnership approach is to teach the children how to create effective digital photographs and give them lots of practical projects to build their skillset and their confidence in their own abilities. There were lots of opportunities to share ideas and work in groups as well as individuals.

  • Wirksworth Junior School, Derbyshire
  • Grange Primary School, Wickford, Essex

Cinematic Art was the focus for two groups of students at schools in Cheshire and Devon.

St Faith’s at Ash School in Canterbury and Abbey Girls Independent School both opted to run a series of workshops with a group of 14 – 17 year olds to explore Cinematic Art.

Wirksworth JuniorThe workshops were designed and run by Imaging Partnership who suggested that the schools may benefit from connecting together to share ideas and learning experiences.

This proved to be a successful collaboration and both schools were pleased by this partnership approach which was brought about by teachers and Imaging Partnership practitioners emailing each other throughout the 8 week duration of the workshop programme.

Throughout the programme, students worked independently and in group on cinematic related topics.  These included hair and make-up, fashion design, sound design, film making, 3D design (using computers), fine art, cinematography, animation, and visual effects.

Both schools reported back that they found the programme successful and students enjoyed the practical challenges and the exploration of cinematic related topics.

  • Woolston Primary School, Cheshire
  • Halwill Primary School, Exeter, Devonshire

And the family came too…..at a series of afterschool photography workshops delivered by Imaging Partnership.

The family photography clubs were a hit at Woolston Primary school Cheshire and Halwill Primary School Exeter. As both schools were offering the family friendly workshops, the Imaging Partnership practitioners suggested that the schools shared their learning experiences and ideas as they went along.

During the workshops the whole family had the opportunity to learn and practice new skills together. Starting with the basics of photography and progressing to a more complex level, workshops are designed to encourage family members to engage with their child’s learning and learn some skills necessary to support their child through their schoolwork.  Halwill Primary

The emphasis of these workshops was on practical hands-on learning, designed to give a better understanding of how a camera works and to demonstrate how following some basic principles can easily improve an image.

Over the six week series, families worked on a range of themes including,

Portraits, fine art photography, landscapes and wildlife, photojournalism, Still Life and sports photography.

The sessions were very successful and parents and children reported that they had enjoyed learning something new together which they can take into their everyday lives.

Case Studies – Accredited courses